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P: 515-465-3511 

1112 Willis Ave, Perry, IA 50220

© 2018 by Hotel Pattee. Proudly created with SPIN.

PREMIER ROOMS

These one king and two queen rooms offer a desk, lounging chair and a large bathroom with a jetted tub and separate walk-in shower. These rooms are perfect for date nights and weekend getaways!  

 

Want a specific themed room?  Please call us directly at 515-465-3511 as you cannot request a specific room via this website.  Thank you.

View Our Premier Rooms:

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Premier King

 
1913 Farmhouse
The Farmhouse room revisits the early days of many farms that
consisted of several different animals including cattle, sheep, pigs, goats, ducks, and chickens.
The unique aspect about farm life at this time was the fact
that you actually grew the crops for your animals. People were
very attached to their animals during this period. This room
represents the hard work that early farms put in working long
days during every season of the year.
Barry Kemp
In the early 1960s Oscar Mayer sent a
man to run its meat processing plant in Perry. For several
weeks he and his family lived in the Hotel Pattee. Barry Kemp,
creator of "Newhart" and "Coach," was that man's son. Kemp
remembers walking all over town and coming "home" to the
hotel each evening in those late summer weeks before the
family moved into the house they shared while he was in junior
and senior high.
Bill Bell
From local Iowa marching band to the
New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Bill Bell became one
of the most well recognized tuba players. Bill Bell began
playing tuba in a boys' band at age 10 in Fairfield, IA. In
the early part of the century most towns of note had a
town band. This music beginning took him all the way to
New York. Family brought Bill Bell back to Iowa where
he spent his final days.
Dutch
The Dutch had come to Iowa with their families
in search of farmland. They built their own communities
around the Reformed Church. Most Iowans know of Pella as a
Dutch settlement. There are other settlements and colleges in
Orange City and Hull in Northwestern Iowa. Those immigrants
put down deep roots, some that reach to Perry. This room
honors them. The room is decorated in the Hindeloopen style,
a Dutch folk art tradition that features woodcarving and colorful
painted surfaces.
Japanese
This room is designed by Luke Willis, a Japanese
American and descendant of Harvey Willis, founder of Perry. Willis
was commissioned to create this tranquil, Japanese experience. Designed
with limited furniture, a raised platform with tatami mats,
and a futon style, king bed are surround by warm wood and subtle
lighting.
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Premier Two Queens

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Amana Colonies
Among Iowa's most famous immigrants
are the people who came from Germany and founded the Amana
Colonies in Eastern Iowa in 1855. There they lived communally
until 1932. During the Great Depression they began to interact
with their Iowa neighbors. Restaurants, museums, hotels, historical
tours, and shops with handcrafts are now a draw for visitors.
Wine and furniture makers as well as farmers and the textile
makers are the people of the Amanas that have given our state
an important heritage.
American Indian
Before the Europeans came the Indians.
Iowa, which means "Beautiful Land," is the name of
one of the tribes that lived on this land more than 300 years
ago. Though many tribes lived in Iowa over the centuries,
the Ioway, part of the Sioux Indian family, the Sac, and the
Fox were the main inhabitants of this region. Many Iowa
counties, such as Taimah, Wapello, Kishkekosh, and Powsheik,
are named for Fox chiefs.
Chinese
Along with the railroad in the late 19th Century came immigrants from all
over the world, including China. Research of the region's past discovered that a Chinese
man named William Arshong had owned and operated a market in Perry in 1875 as well evidence
of other Chinese immigrants in the area. No one is sure how or why Chinese immigrants
arrived in Dallas County, IA. Some of the room decor
was donated from Roberta Ahmanson's private collection
from a trip to Hong Kong.
King's Daughters
About the time the Pattee's were building a hotel, local members
of various King's Daughters Circles, led by the Alpha Circle, were raising funds to build the
King's Daughters Hospital where thousands of Perry residents were born and died. The
King's Daughters did more than build hospitals. They and their descendants continue to
"lend a hand" wherever they can. This room honors those women and all those who give
their time to help others.
Mexican
One of the largest groups of Latin American
Immigrants to Perry comes from Mexico. We enjoy their music,
their art, their food, and in this room, their design. Since 1964,
Iowans have exchanged humanitarian, educational, and medical
aid and information with their sister state of Yucatan. With
this room we welcome our Mexican friends.
Swedish
One of the major immigrant groups to settle in
Iowa and the Midwest came from Scandinavia - Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and
their neighbor Finland. By 1910, 1.4 million Swedish first
and second generation immigrants had settled in Iowa and
the Midwest. In the room you'll find various aspects of the
Swedish Gustavian styles from the beds to the chairs and
tables. You'll also find some actual authentic Gustavian furniture
throughout the room as well.
V.T. Snick Hamlin
Years ago, the Perry Daily Chief hired a local kid, Snick Hamlin, who
liked to draw. He created a cartoon strip, "Alley Oop," that captured the heart of our nation.
This room honors him. On August 7, 1933, a caveman named Alley Oop first appeared in
America's newspaper comics. Not long thereafter, Alley encountered a dinosaur named Dinny,
and the two formed a partnership -- Alley Oop not only rode on Dinny's back but adopted
him as a pet.
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